Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections for Treating Infertility

Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections pic

Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections
Image: fertility-biocenter.com

A psychiatrist in private practice, Shulamit Glaubach, MD, takes a holistic approach to general health and well-being when treating patients at her San Francisco office. One of Shulamit Glaubach, MD’s current medical interests is the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections for the treatment of infertility.

Research has shown that the injection of PRP has proven successful in addressing infertility in women who suffer from a thin endometrium (the mucous membrane lining the inside of the uterus). Medical technicians prepare PRP using the patient’s own blood, a centrifuge, and other laboratory practices. The result is a blood sample with platelet levels that are far above baseline.

In 2015, the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine published a study that declared PRP an effective treatment for infertility in women with thin endometriums. In short, PRP injections improved pregnancy outcome in these women by promoting endometrial growth.

In 2016, further preclinical trials in Greece showed that PRP rejuvenated ovaries in menopausal women, ultimately restoring them to fertility. Of the 60 women in these trials, 40 became capable of conceiving and 9 actually got pregnant.

Endometriosis and Pregnancy

Endometriosis  pic

Endometriosis
Image: webmd.com

San Francisco resident and psychiatrist Shulamit Glaubach, MD, uses a holistic approach to treat patients at her private practice. Shulamit Glaubach, MD, has developed a professional interest in helping couples work through stress related to infertility.

Endometriosis is a condition in which the lining of the uterus grows outside the uterus. The condition affects over 11 percent of American women, and a common side effect of endometriosis is trouble conceiving a child. Though experts aren’t exactly sure how endometriosis is specifically linked to infertility, they have identified several factors that can have a significant impact on reproductive success.

First, infertility can be due to an underlying immune condition related to cytokines, which are chemicals released by the immune system in response to the endometrial tissue’s location outside of the uterus. Patches of endometriosis are also known to block or change the shape of the pelvis or reproductive organs, making it difficult for sperm to travel to the egg. Finally, when the endometrium, or uterine lining, does not form properly, the implantation of a fertilized egg may not be successful.

Though endometriosis can affect a woman’s fertility, many women with the condition have conceived successfully. A fertility specialist can make specific recommendations based on an individual’s circumstances.

Neuroplasticity – Rewiring the Brain

Neuroplasticity pic

Neuroplasticity
Image: britannica.com

A psychiatrist in San Francisco, Shulamit Glaubach, MD, has been treating children, adolescents, and adults for 20 years. Shulamit Glaubach, MD, is also interested in the physiological aspects of the operation of the human brain, including neuroplasticity – the ability of the brain to form and reorganize synaptic connections, especially in response to learning or experience or following an injury (https://www.britannica.com/science/neuroplasticity).

Also called brain malleability or brain plasticity. Brain plasticity is the study of a physical process. Gray matter can actually shrink or thicken; neural connections can be forged and refined or weakened and severed. Changes in the physical brain manifest as changes in our abilities. For example, each time we learn a new dance step, it reflects a change in our physical brains: new “wires” (neural pathways) that give instructions to our bodies on how to perform the step. Each time we forget someone’s name, it also reflects brain change— “wires” that once connected to the memory have been degraded or even severed. As these examples show, changes in the brain can result in improved skills (a new dance step) or a weakening of skills (a forgotten name).

Another important finding of the recent neuroplasticity research is the discovery of how closely our senses are connected to memory and cognition. Because of their interdependence, a weakness in one is often related to—or even the cause of—a weakness in the other. For example, we all know that Alzheimer’s patients slowly lose their memories. One way this manifests is that they eat less food. Why? As it turns out, visual deficits are also a part of Alzheimer’s. People eat less because they can’t see the food as well. (https://www.brainhq.com/brain-resources/brain-plasticity/brain-plasticity-luminaries/alice-cronin-golomb-phd).

Research shows that how you respond to stress may be a key factor in how your brain ages. Researchers found that people with increased stress have increased risk for mental disorders a decade later, especially anxiety and depression. The message is clear: managing daily stress is a key factor in keeping your brain healthy as you age, and this has implications for everything from depression to dementia. A great tool for stress management is Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), an energy psychology tool that can help reprogram your body’s reactions to everyday stress. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWu3rSEddZI&feature=youtu.be).

The point is, you have much more control over your body, mind, and brain than you might think. If you can mold and shape your brain, you are not entirely at the mercy of your genetics or the neural pathways you brought into this world or formed as a child—and this is great news!

Additional information:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0td5aw1KXA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Chr3rQ6Vpcw
https://blog.udemy.com/neuroplasticity-exercises/

Using Tai Chi to Relieve Stress and Anxiety

Tai Chi

A graduate of Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, Shulamit Glaubach, MD, serves as a psychiatrist in San Francisco. Dr. Glaubach completed extensive training in psychiatry, including fellowships at Cornell University and New York University. Knowledgeable in both Western medicine and alternative medicine, Shulamit Glaubach, MD, recommends tai chi to relieve anxiety and depression.

A Chinese martial art, tai chi is now being used to relieve stress. A low-impact form of exercise, the practice is generally safe for people of all ages and fitness levels and requires no equipment.

Tai chi involves a series of stretches and movements performed slowly with deep breathing. Combining physical movement with mindfulness exercises, tai chi teaches practitioners various ways to move energy within their bodies.

The psychological benefits of tai chi include reduced anxiety and depression. The movements can also enhance aerobic capacity, energy level, flexibility, balance, and muscle strength. Some individuals also notice improved sleep, a stronger immune system, and decreased joint pain.

Psychological Aspects of Infertility Treatment

Infertility pic

Infertility
Image: health.harvard.edu

Shulamit Glaubach, MD, is triple boarded in child, adolescent, and adult psychiatry. As well as working with children and adolescents, Shulamit Glaubach, MD, works with adults dealing with life difficulties like infertility.

Many couples (heterosexual and homosexual) and single individuals who struggle with infertility experience a variety of negative feelings stemming from their difficulty in conceiving and having a child naturally. They might feel stigmatized or unsupported, develop feelings of low self-esteem, or become anxious or depressed. After trying unsuccessfully for a child, the individual(s) may decide to pursue specialized fertility treatments, such as in vitro fertilization. While these efforts can lead to positive results, they are also associated with new psychological struggles or difficulties that are important to be aware of.

For instance, hormonal medications and fertility drugs can have side effects such as difficulty sleeping and irritability, which can create tension in the relationship or poor overall well-being, such as headaches. The individual(s) may find that their lives seem to revolve around fertility treatments and the woman’s ovulation cycles, factors which may take away spontaneity from their love life and add stress. With having a baby being a key focus in their lives, the individual(s) may decide to postpone reaching personal goals such as going back to school or traveling. This can lead to general feelings of dissatisfaction over time. Finally, on top of these factors, the costs of pursuing fertility treatments can create a financial burden. The individual(s) may find that they argue more due to money worries and other anxieties.

Since the course of infertility treatments can be a difficult time, individual(s) should not hesitate to seek help. Counseling and psychotherapy can help them talk through and understand their emotions. They can also learn techniques to help them manage anxiety or feelings of sadness. Some techniques include but are not limited to, acupuncture, breathing techniques, mindfulness, and meditation.

How Endometriosis Impacts Pregnancy

Endometriosis pic

Endometriosis
Image: healthywomen.org

A board-certified psychiatrist, Shulamit Glaubach, MD, treats patients at her private practice in San Francisco, California. In addition to providing behavioral therapy utilizing a holistic approach, Shulamit Glaubach, MD, leverages her expertise to counsel couples struggling with infertility due to endometriosis.

In the United States, 11 percent of couples of reproductive age have experienced difficulty in conceiving a child or sustaining a pregnancy. Of this population, one-third of cases are related to female fertility issues, such as endometriosis. A woman diagnosed with endometriosis has clumps of tissue known as implants that grow outside the lining of the uterus in locations such as the abdomen or pelvis.

During a woman’s menstrual cycle, the tissue that lines the uterus, which is known as endometrium, thickens and breaks down. Subsequently, the body sheds it as blood.

However, in endometriosis, the blood does not leave the body. This results in irritation and pain that develops into scar tissue or cysts. Both limit a female’s chances of becoming pregnant.

Surgery has been typically implemented to rectify this condition in the past. Currently there are various alternative modalities that are not as invasive to help with fertility in those who suffer from endometriosis. Doctors may also prescribe fertility drugs with or without artificial insemination to help a woman conceive a child. With early detection and proper care, a woman may be able to become pregnant within three years.